Research Lunch Talks: Stephanie Ro ’15

By Samantha Khalsa

All Smiles:  Stephanie Ro ‘15 is a senior participating in Westridge’s Research elective.  She gave a lunch presentation this past Tuesday on her electrical and biomedical engineering research project.

This past Tuesday, Westridge’s research lunch talk series continued with Stephanie Ro ’15 who presented her research on “Advancements of Optical Communication & Biomedical Imaging/Sensing.”  Ro is one of eight seniors placed at nearby labs for independent research projects as a part of Westridge’s Research elective.  Along with a end of the year poster session, lunch presentations give students the opportunity to showcase their work and learn communication skills.

Ro works in a Caltech lab that focuses on electrical and biomedical engineering.  She has worked on one project involving the usage of a micro ink printer, a printer which releases 120 microscopic droplets of ink per second.  In order to capture the droplets on camera to be later seen on a computer screen, Ro worked to synchronize both the printer’s release of the droplets and the flash of the camera using amplifiers.

Research Showcase:  Stephanie presents her research on “Advancements of Optical Communication & Biomedical Imaging/Sensing.”  She has worked at a Caltech electrical and biomedical engineering lab since the beginning of the school year.

Research Showcase: Stephanie presents her research on “Advancements of Optical Communication & Biomedical Imaging/Sensing.” She has worked at a Caltech electrical and biomedical engineering lab since the beginning of the school year.

On her current, separate project, Ro is trying to create a pacemaker that runs off of blood instead of battery, thus increasing the reliability, versatility, and longevity of pacemaker devices while also reducing costs because patients would not need periodic operations to change batteries.

Ro says of her favorite aspect of working in a lab,“Like most people who conduct research, I think the most exciting parts for me are the hands-on work experience and the challenge of learning material beyond my basic high school science curriculum.  A lot of my research is trial and error, so the moments where I find a solution to whatever problem my professor gave me are really the moments which makes me appreciative of what I do.”

Of the challenges she has faced, Ro says, “As simple as this looks, all of the different components I had to add needed problem solving.  Every element that I had to add was a new challenge.”

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